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A REASONABLE EXPECTATION OF PRIVACY? YOU BE THE JUDGE!

Workshop presented at the Computers, Freedom & Privacy Conference
Montréal, Québec
May 1, 2007

On the Identity Trail researchers Carlisle Adams, Jane Bailey, Jacquelyn Burkell, Jennifer Chandler, Ian Kerr, David Matheson, and Valerie Steeves, and project manager Carole Lucock presented a full day workshop at the Computers, Freedom and Privacy Conference in Montréal on May 1, 2007. 

The workshop, titled “A Reasonable Expectation of Privacy?  You be the Judge?”, built on earlier work exploring the notion of a reasonable expectation of privacy in the context of new technologies.  Many jurisdictions around the world have adopted a ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’ standard in limiting legal entitlements to privacy. The On the Identity Trail workshop challenges this expectation-based limitation through a unique, playful and interactive presentation of two Supreme Court decisions: one from Canada and one from the United States.

Using FLIR (forward looking infrared) as a case study, this workshop asks fundamental questions about the use of various new technologies to augment the sensory perceptions of law enforcement personnel and considers the impact of new technologies on the privacy that one can reasonably expect in both public and private places.

On the Identity Trail produced two short films exploring the "reasonable expectations of privacy" for the workshop. The short films were produced and directed by Max Binnie, Katie Black and Jeremy Hessing-Lewis with contributions from Daniel Albahary, Ian Kerr, and Jane Bailey. They are available for download under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 license after the jump. 

The first film, "Tessling-Just the Facts", is a brief dramatization of the facts that gave rise to R. v. Tessling [2004], a criminal case which addressed the concept of the "reasonable expectation of privacy" with respect to forward-looking infrared (FLIR) technology.

Download Tessling-Just the Facts (Save As...))
Format: .mov[Quicktime],Duration: 4min22sec, Size: 9.53MB.

The second film, "CFP-Interviews", is a documentary that provides the viewer with a taste of various public interest perspectives on how to conceive of "reasonable expectations of privacy". It features short interviews with the following experts in the field of privacy, civil rights and law, in order of appearance:
 
 
Download Public Interest Perspectives (Save As...)
Format: .mov[Quicktime], Duration:25min52sec, Size: 54.8MB.
 
 
WORKSHOP PRESENTATIONS

A Reasonable Expectation of Privacy? You Be the Judge!
Jane Bailey

Click here to download the presentation slides.

Perspectives on Privacy: The Technological View
Carlisle Adams

Click here to download the presentation slides.

Reasonable Expectations of Privacy: Sociological Perspectives
Valerie Steeves

Click here to download the presentation slides.

Reasonable Expectations of Privacy: The Psychological Perspective
Jacquelyn Burkell

Click here to download the presentation slides.

Deeply Personal Information and the Reasonable Expectation of Privacy in Tessling
David Matheson

Click here to download the presentation slides.

Tessling on my brain: reasonable expectation of privacy, technology, & the future
Ian Kerr

Click here to download the presentation slides.








 
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